Category: Science

Everything comes here

ESO telescope reveals what could be the smallest dwarf planet yet in the solar system — ScienceDaily

Astronomers using ESO’s SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) have revealed that the asteroid Hygiea could be classified as a dwarf planet. The object is the fourth largest in the asteroid belt after Ceres, Vesta and Pallas. For the first time, astronomers have observed Hygiea in sufficiently high resolution to study its surface…
Read more

Dolphins demonstrate coordinated cooperation — ScienceDaily

Cooperation is one of the most important abilities for any social species. From hunting, breeding, and child rearing, it has allowed many animals — including humans — to survive and thrive. As we better understand the details on how animals work together, researchers have been focusing on the degree of cooperation and the cognitive abilities…
Read more

New data on the evolution of plants and origin of species — ScienceDaily

There are over 500,000 plant species in the world today. They all evolved from a common ancestor. How this leap in biodiversity happened is still unclear. In the upcoming issue of Nature, an international team of researchers, including scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, presents the results of a unique project on the evolution of…
Read more

New measurement of Hubble constant adds to cosmic mystery — ScienceDaily

New measurements of the rate of expansion of the universe, led by astronomers at the University of California, Davis, add to a growing mystery: Estimates of a fundamental constant made with different methods keep giving different results. “There’s a lot of excitement, a lot of mystification and from my point of view it’s a lot…
Read more

The findings could lead to a universal flu vaccine and more effective emergency treatments — ScienceDaily

A nationwide team of researchers has found an antibody that protects mice against a wide range of potentially lethal influenza viruses, advancing efforts to design of a universal vaccine that could either treat or protect people against all strains of the virus. The study, which Scripps Research conducted jointly with Washington University School of Medicine…
Read more

Physicists simulate critical ‘reheating’ period that kickstarted the Big Bang in the universe’s first fractions of a second — ScienceDaily

As the Big Bang theory goes, somewhere around 13.8 billion years ago the universe exploded into being, as an infinitely small, compact fireball of matter that cooled as it expanded, triggering reactions that cooked up the first stars and galaxies, and all the forms of matter that we see (and are) today. Just before the…
Read more

Did an extraterrestrial impact trigger the extinction of ice-age animals?

A controversial theory that suggests an extraterrestrial body crashing to Earth almost 13,000 years ago caused the extinction of many large animals and a probable population decline in early humans is gaining traction from research sites around the world. The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis, controversial from the time it was presented in 2007, proposes that…
Read more

Exceptional continental record of biotic recovery after the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction

Abstract We report a time-calibrated stratigraphic section in Colorado that contains unusually complete fossils of mammals, reptiles, and plants, and elucidates the drivers and tempo of biotic recovery during the poorly known first million years after the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction (KPgE). Within ~100 thousand years (ka) post-KPgE, mammalian taxonomic richness doubled and maximum mammalian body…
Read more

UC Santa Barbara/Google researchers demonstrate the power of 53 entangled qubits — ScienceDaily

Researchers in UC Santa Barbara/Google scientist John Martinis’ group have made good on their claim to quantum supremacy. Using 53 entangled quantum bits (“qubits”), their Sycamore computer has taken on — and solved — a problem considered intractable for classical computers. “A computation that would take 10,000 years on a classical supercomputer took 200 seconds…
Read more

Mars once had salt lakes similar to those on Earth — ScienceDaily

Mars once had salt lakes that are similar to those on Earth and has gone through wet and dry periods, according to an international team of scientists that includes a Texas A&M University College of Geosciences researcher. Marion Nachon, a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Texas A&M, and colleagues…
Read more